The Privilege and Burden of Conflict Reporting in Nigeria: Navigating the Emotional Toll

Maiduguri, northeastern Nigeria
Maiduguri, northeastern Nigeria. (Photo credit: Hauwa Shaffii Nuhu 2024)

The Privilege and Burden of Conflict Reporting in Nigeria: Navigating the Emotional Toll

The Burden of Bearing Witness

Last month, I walked away from an important story that needed to be told. I was in the field in Maiduguri, northeastern Nigeria, where the over-a-decade-old Boko Haram insurgency has caused immeasurable devastation to lives and properties. I was walking out of a camp for internally displaced persons on the outskirts of the city, alongside a prominent member of the camp, when I came upon a woman with crutches.

I weighed the information he had just given me against the recent strain of my passion for my work, and I made the decision to walk away from it. I did not think my heart and spirit would be able to take the full story without breaking. That night, I struggled to sleep.

My companion pointed to her and said to me, “That lady, once there was a military officer who came every day to rape her because he knew she could not run away because of her disability. We had to intervene before it stopped.”

It is possible that I have come across more devastating and heartless stories than this since I started conflict reporting years ago; my memory fails me now, perhaps also because I am actively trying not to think about it. But that tip hit me with a force that knocked me right out of my mind. He wanted me to tell the story; perhaps the reportage might bring the woman some measure of justice, and if not, her story would still be an important one to document. He was right. Journalism is the only medium through which people like that woman could ever speak. I weighed the information he had just given me against the recent strain of my passion for my work, and I made the decision to walk away from it. I did not think my heart and spirit would be able to take the full story without breaking. That night, I struggled to sleep.

 

Reevaluating the Role of Conflict Reporting

“If we don’t tell our stories, others will, and they will tell it wrong.”

This happened at a time when I had begun to ask myself serious and uncomfortable questions about the work that I was doing. What is the value of conflict reporting? What is the value of this reportage, especially in the face of the enormousness of conflict and war? There are over 350,000 lives that have been lost to the Boko Haram crisis. Over 3 million more people in Nigeria have been displaced, too. What was I doing thinking I could make a difference by telling the stories of a few of those people? What value did it ever bring? What did it matter in the grand scheme of things? And so when I saw and heard about that crippled woman, I walked away.

I keep pitching the sheer enormity of this insurgency against the very, very little work we’re doing, and I feel there is little to no value at all to it in the face of that comparison

It isn’t lost on me that these questions can only come out of a disillusioned and fatigued mind. I have always said that journalism is important, even if the only thing it achieves is to serve as a tool for documenting history. Suppose your work pops up in a Google search when, years from now, an academic or even a curious person is researching how people survived in these times, then your work as a journalist is done. I have always said this. But lately, it doesn’t feel enough.

I spoke to a dear friend and coworker about my feelings of disillusionment. “I keep pitching the sheer enormity of this insurgency against the very, very little work we’re doing, and I feel there is little to no value at all to it in the face of that comparison,” I told him.

“The thing is... Our job isn't to fight the insurgency, H,” he said to me. “It's never been. It's to document it. And if in that process, some or many people suffer less (as often does happen, even if we don't always see the full picture), then we count ourselves lucky to have contributed to that outcome.”

His words were wise and true. They are also words I have said to myself many times in the past. It reminded me of the period I made the decision to do conflict reporting full-time. Before then, I had mostly been a poet. I was fresh out of law school and back in my parents’ home in Niger State, North-central Nigeria. And in the news, various terror attacks by the Boko Haram terror group were being reported in the state. It was terrifying. The state capital, where I lived with my family, was swelling with people who had been displaced from rural villages. I started off volunteering with a humanitarian organisation to provide and distribute aid to displaced people. Then, I started to document the things I was seeing. It was born out of the fear that if we did not tell our stories, no one else would. This thought was reinforced when I later met my now employer, who presented me with an even more scary but probable thought: “If we don’t tell our stories, others will, and they will tell it wrong.”

I thought obsessively, like most human beings in the world have been doing, about the humanitarian crisis in Gaza; how thoroughly it is being documented by its journalists and even ordinary citizens, how evidence of the atrocity has been diligently documented on social media, in videos, in reports. And how so little that has meant for accountability.

When I returned to Abuja three weeks ago, those depressing questions weighed me down so heavily and so frequently that I struggled to find light. I sat at my desk for hours, clicking away, opening and closing documents that needed to be edited, and being unproductive. I thought obsessively, like most human beings in the world have been doing, about the humanitarian crisis in Gaza; how thoroughly it is being documented by its journalists and even ordinary citizens, how evidence of the atrocity has been diligently documented on social media, in videos, in reports. And how so little that has meant for accountability. In fact, over 110 journalists have been killed by the crisis.

As things continued to get worse, I googled ‘the importance of conflict reporting’ and found nothing of note. The results that popped up ranged from ethics of conflict reporting and how to do conflict reporting. Never why.

Eventually, I had to take a few days off work as I found myself being swallowed by the bleak realities.

 

the field in Maiduguri, northeastern Nigeria

 

The "Privilege" of Documenting Tragedy

As I worked out in the gym two weeks after that Maiduguri trip, precisely on Feb. 24th, I received a message from someone reminding me that it was exactly ten years since the tragic Buni Yadi massacre. The massacre, which took place in 2014 by terrorists belonging to Boko Haram, remains one of the most tragic and senseless acts of war since the group broke out in 2009. They threw balls of fire under the beds as teenage schoolboys slept. They then positioned themselves at doors and windows and shot those who tried to escape. Those who made it into the school compound were slaughtered. Some accounts say up to 59 schoolboys died. This is possible, but I could only trace and verify the names of 29 boys.

late 2022, I started the long task of tracking down the families of the boys who died, as well as the boys who survived. I went from Potiskum, to Damagum, to Damaturu, to Bauchi to Maiduguri in search of these people over the course of two months. The result was a series of reports attempting to document the tragedy from multiple and holistic angles.

As I read that message about the anniversary, I remembered Mustapha, fondly called Musty by his mother, who was killed by a bullet to the thigh. I remembered Adamu, who was burned to death and buried with neither of his parents present. I remembered Mohammed, who survived a bullet to the neck and who, to this day, has not recovered from the trauma.

Besides the Wikipedia entry about the massacre, I realised that my reportage on the tragedy years after it occurred remains the only extensive source of information about what happened, how it happened, and what the aftermath was. I know because during my research phase before I went to the field, I tried to lay my hands on any reports about it. Besides very brief and often inaccurate news reports, I found nothing. I also know because all the people I spoke to on the field said they were speaking to the media for the first time.

I googled ‘Buni Yadi Massacre’, and my reports poured out right after the Wikipedia entry. The realisation that I had been privileged to document those stories hit me in a way that nearly moved me to tears. Because it is a privilege. I got off the treadmill and sat somewhere. As I scrolled through the reports again, the word privilege kept echoing over and over in my mind. The lack of tangible impact does not equal unimportance. To be able to help thousands of people remember, to articulate the lives and circumstances of victims of war who have no other means of being remembered, is a privilege.

I know from current experience how possible it is to look away, to choose to walk away in an attempt to care for oneself. I also knew how difficult and arduous the task was to unearth victims of something as devastating as the Buni Yadi massacre and to sit with them and have them trust me with their grief.

the field in Maiduguri, northeastern Nigeria

 

The Enduring Importance of Conflict Journalism

My work, the work of all conflict reporters, is not only of history but of devotion. It is as important as air is to the lungs. Because a society that cannot remember its tragedies, that does not have a reliable way of doing so, is not one worth living in. Because of conflict reporting, there will never be a shortage of information and resources on what’s going on in Gaza, or how the Boko Haram insurgency in Africa has destroyed lives, familial bonds, and property.

Conflict reporting makes it impossible for societies to feign ignorance of the violence done to them.

 

 

The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera Journalism Review’s editorial stance.

 

المزيد من المقالات

رصد وتفنيد التغطيات الصحفية المخالفة للمعايير المهنية في الحرب الحالية على غزة

في هذه الصفحة، سيعمد فريق تحرير مجلة الصحافة على جمع الأخبار التي تنشرها المؤسسات الصحفية حول الحرب الحالية على غزة التي تنطوي على تضليل أو تحيز أو مخالفة للمعايير التحريرية ومواثيق الشرف المهنية.

مجلة الصحافة نشرت في: 12 يونيو, 2024
بعد عام من الحرب.. عن محنة الصحفيات السودانيات

دخلت الحرب الداخلية في السودان عامها الثاني، بينما يواجه الصحفيون، والصحفيات خاصّةً، تحديات غير مسبوقة، تتمثل في التضييق والتهديد المستمر، وفرض طوق على تغطية الانتهاكات ضد النساء.

أميرة صالح نشرت في: 6 يونيو, 2024
الصحفي الغزي وصراع "القلب والعقل"

يعيش في جوف الصحفي الفلسطيني الذي يعيش في غزة شخصان: الأول إنسان يريد أن يحافظ على حياته وحياة أسرته، والثاني صحفي يريد أن يحافظ على حياة السكان متمسكا بالحقيقة والميدان. بين هذين الحدين، أو ما تصفه الصحفية مرام حميد، بصراع القلب والعقل، يواصل الصحفي الفلسطيني تصدير رواية أراد لها الاحتلال أن تبقى بعيدة "عن الكاميرا".

Maram
مرام حميد نشرت في: 2 يونيو, 2024
فلسطين وأثر الجزيرة

قرر الاحتلال الإسرائيلي إغلاق مكتب الجزيرة في القدس لإسكات "الرواية الأخرى"، لكن اسم القناة أصبح مرادفا للبحث عن الحقيقة في زمن الانحياز الكامل لإسرائيل. تشرح الباحثة حياة الحريري في هذا المقال، "أثر" الجزيرة والتوازن الذي أحدثته أثناء الحرب المستمرة على فلسطين.

حياة الحريري نشرت في: 29 مايو, 2024
"إننا نطرق جدار الخزان"

تجربة سمية أبو عيطة في تغطية حرب الإبادة الجماعية في غزة فريدة ومختلفة. يوم السابع من أكتوبر ستطلب من إدارة مؤسستها بإسطنبول الالتحاق بغزة. حدس الصحفية وزاد التجارب السابقة، قاداها إلى معبر رفح ثم إلى غزة لتجد نفسها مع مئات الصحفيين الفلسطينيين "يدقون جدار الخزان".

سمية أبو عيطة نشرت في: 26 مايو, 2024
في تغطية الحرب على غزة.. صحفية وأُمًّا ونازحة

كيف يمكن أن تكوني أما وصحفية ونازحة وزوجة لصحفي في نفس الوقت؟ ما الذي يهم أكثر: توفير الغذاء للولد الجائع أم توفير تغطية مهنية عن حرب الإبادة الجماعية؟ الصحفية مرح الوادية تروي قصتها مع الطفل، النزوح، الهواجس النفسية، والصراع المستمر لإيجاد مكان آمن في قطاع غير آمن.

مرح الوادية نشرت في: 20 مايو, 2024
كيف أصبحت "خبرا" في سجون الاحتلال؟

عادة ما يحذر الصحفيون الذين يغطون الحروب والصراعات من أن يصبحوا هم "الخبر"، لكن في فلسطين انهارت كل إجراءات السلامة، ليجد الصحفي ضياء كحلوت نفسه معتقلا في سجون الاحتلال يواجه التعذيب بتهمة واضحة: ممارسة الصحافة.

ضياء الكحلوت نشرت في: 15 مايو, 2024
"ما زلنا على قيد التغطية"

أصبحت فكرة استهداف الصحفيين من طرف الاحتلال متجاوزة، لينتقل إلى مرحلة قتل عائلاتهم وتخويفها. هشام زقوت، مراسل الجزيرة بغزة، يحكي عن تجربته في تغطية حرب الإبادة الجماعية والبحث عن التوازن الصعب بين حق العائلة وواجب المهنة.

هشام زقوت نشرت في: 12 مايو, 2024
آليات الإعلام البريطاني السائد في تأطير الحرب الإسرائيلية على غزّة

كيف استخدم الإعلام البريطاني السائد إستراتيجيات التأطير لتكوين الرأي العام بشأن مجريات الحرب على غزّة وما الذي يكشفه تقرير مركز الرقابة على الإعلام عن تبعات ذلك وتأثيره على شكل الرواية؟

مجلة الصحافة نشرت في: 19 مارس, 2024
دعم الحقيقة أو محاباة الإدارة.. الصحفيون العرب في الغرب والحرب على غزة

يعيش الصحفيون العرب الذين يعملون في غرف الأخبار الغربية "تناقضات" فرضتها حرب الاحتلال على غزة. اختار جزء منهم الانحياز إلى الحقيقة مهما كانت الضريبة ولو وصلت إلى الطرد، بينما اختار آخرون الانصهار مع "السردية الإسرائيلية" خوفا من الإدارة.

مجلة الصحافة نشرت في: 29 فبراير, 2024
يوميات صحفي فلسطيني تحت النار

فيم يفكر صحفي فلسطيني ينجو يوميا من غارات الاحتلال: في إيصال الصورة إلى العالم أم في مصير عائلته؟ وماذا حين يفقد أفراد عائلته: هل يواصل التغطية أم يتوقف؟ وكيف يشتغل في ظل انقطاع وسائل الاتصال واستحالة الوصول إلى المصادر؟

محمد أبو قمر  نشرت في: 3 ديسمبر, 2023
كيف يمكن لتدقيق المعلومات أن يكون سلاحًا ضد الرواية الإسرائيلية؟

في السابق كان من السهل على الاحتلال الإسرائيلي "اختطاف الرواية الأولى" وتصديرها إلى وسائل الإعلام العالمية المنحازة، لكن حرب غزة بينت أهمية عمل مدققي المعلومات الذين كشفوا زيف سردية قتل الأطفال وذبح المدنيين. في عصر مدققي المعلومات، هل انتهت صلاحية "الأكاذيب السياسية الكبرى"؟

حسام الوكيل نشرت في: 17 نوفمبر, 2023
انحياز صارخ لإسرائيل.. إعلام ألمانيا يسقط في امتحان المهنية مجدداً

بينما تعيش وسائل الإعلام الألمانية الداعمة تقليدياً لإسرائيل حالة من الهستيريا، ومنها صحيفة "بيلد" التي بلغت بها درجة التضليل على المتظاهرين الداعمين لفلسطين، واتهامهم برفع شعار "اقصفوا إسرائيل"، بينما كان الشعار الأصلي هو "ألمانيا تمول.. وإسرائيل تقصف". وتصف الصحيفة شعارات عادية كـ "فلسطين حرة" بشعارات الكراهية.

مجلة الصحافة نشرت في: 15 نوفمبر, 2023
استخدام الأرقام في تغطية الحروب.. الإنسان أولاً

كيف نستعرض أرقام الذين قتلهم الاحتلال الإسرائيلي دون طمس هوياتهم وقصصهم؟ هل إحصاء الضحايا في التغطية الإعلامية يمكن أن يؤدي إلى "السأم من التعاطف"؟ وكيف نستخدم الأرقام والبيانات لإبقاء الجمهور مرتبطا بالتغطية الإعلامية لجرائم الحرب التي ترتكبها إسرائيل في غزة؟

أروى الكعلي نشرت في: 14 نوفمبر, 2023
الصحافة ومعركة القانون الدولي لمواجهة انتهاكات الاحتلال الإسرائيلي

من وظائف الصحافة رصد الانتهاكات أثناء الأزمات والحروب، والمساهمة في فضح المتورطين في جرائم الحرب والإبادات الجماعية، ولأن الجرائم في القانون الدولي لا تتقادم، فإن وسائل الإعلام، وهي تغطي حرب إسرائيل على فلسطين، ينبغي أن توظف أدوات القانون الدولي لتقويض الرواية الإسرائيلية القائمة على "الدفاع عن النفس".

نهلا المومني نشرت في: 8 نوفمبر, 2023
هل يحمي القانون الدولي الصحفيين الفلسطينيين؟

لم يقتصر الاحتلال الإسرائيلي على استهداف الصحفيين، بل تجاوزه إلى استهداف عائلاتهم كما فعل مع أبناء وزوجة الزميل وائل الدحدوح، مراسل الجزيرة بفلسطين. كيف ينتهك الاحتلال قواعد القانون الدولي؟ وهل ترتقي هذه الانتهاكات إلى مرتبة "جريمة حرب"؟

بديعة الصوان نشرت في: 26 أكتوبر, 2023
منصات التواصل الاجتماعي.. مساحة فلسطين المصادرة

لم تكتف منصات التواصل الاجتماعي بمحاصرة المحتوى الفلسطيني بل إنها طورت برمجيات ترسخ الانحياز للرواية الإسرائيلية. منذ بداية الحرب على غزة، حجبت صفحات وحسابات، وتعاملت بازدواجية معايير مع خطابات الكراهية الصادرة عن الاحتلال.

إياد الرفاعي نشرت في: 21 أكتوبر, 2023
كيف يساعد التحقق من الأخبار في نسف رواية "الاحتلال" الإسرائيلي؟

كشفت عملية التحقق من الصور والفيديوهات زيف رواية الاحتلال الإسرائيلي الذي حاول أن يسوق للعالم أن حركة حماس أعدمت وذبحت أطفالا وأسرى. في هذا المقال تبرز شيماء العيسائي أهمية التحقق من الأخبار لوسائل الإعلام وللمواطنين الصحفيين وأثرها في الحفاظ على قيمة الحقيقة.

شيماء العيسائي نشرت في: 18 أكتوبر, 2023
"لسعات الصيف".. حينما يهدد عنوان صحفي حياة القرّاء

انتشر "خبر" تخدير نساء والاعتداء عليهن جنسيا في إسبانيا بشكل كبير، على وسائل التواصل الاجتماعي قبل أن تتلقفه وسائل الإعلام، ليتبين أن الخبر مجرد إشاعة. تورطت الصحافة من باب الدفاع عن حقوق النساء في إثارة الذعر في المجتمع دون التأكد من الحقائق والشهادات.

Ilya U. Topper
إيليا توبر Ilya U. Topper نشرت في: 30 يوليو, 2023
كيف نستخدم البيانات في رواية قصص الحرائق؟

كلما اشتد فصل الصيف تشتعل الحرائق في أماكن مختلفة من العالم مخلفة كلفة بشرية ومادية كبيرة. يحتاج الصحفيون، بالإضافة إلى المعرفة المرتبطة بالتغير المناخي، إلى توظيف البيانات لإنتاج قصص شريطة أن يكون محورها الإنسان.

أروى الكعلي نشرت في: 25 يوليو, 2023
انتفاضة الهامش على الشاشات: كيف تغطي وسائل الإعلام الفرنسية أزمة الضواحي؟

اندلعت احتجاجات واسعة في فرنسا بعد مقتل الشاب نائل مرزوق من أصول مغاربية على يدي الشرطة. اختارت الكثير من وسائل الإعلام أن تروج لأطروحة اليمين المتشدد وتبني رواية الشرطة دون التمحيص فيها مستخدمة الإثارة والتلاعب بالمصادر.

أحمد نظيف نشرت في: 16 يوليو, 2023
كيف حققت في قصة اغتيال والدي؟ 

لكل قصة صحفية منظورها الخاص، ولكل منها موضوعها الذي يقتفيه الصحفي ثم يرويه بعد البحث والتقصّي فيه، لكن كيف يكون الحال حين يصبح الصحفي نفسه ضحية لحادثة فظيعة كاغتيال والده مثلا؟ هل بإمكانه البحث والتقصّي ثم رواية قصته وتقديمها كمادة صحفية؟ وأي معايير تفرضها أخلاقيات الصحافة في ذلك كله؟ الصحفية الكولومبية ديانا لوبيز زويلتا تسرد قصة تحقيقها في مقتل والدها.

ديانا لوبيز زويلتا نشرت في: 11 يونيو, 2023
عن أخلاقيات استخدام صور الأطفال مرة أخرى

في زمن الكوارث والأزمات، ماهي المعايير الأخلاقية التي تؤطر نشر صور الأطفال واستعمالها في غرف الأخبار؟ هل ثمة مرجعية تحريرية ثابتة يمكن الاحتكام عليها أم أن الأمر يخضع للنقاش التحريري؟

مجلة الصحافة نشرت في: 9 فبراير, 2023
حذار من الصحفيين الناشطين!

تقود الحماسة الصحفية في بعض الأحيان أثناء الحروب والأزمات إلى تبني ثنائية: الأشرار والأخيار رغم ما تنطوي عليه من مخاطر مهنية. إرضاء المتابعين لم يكن يوما معيارا لصحافة جيدة.

Ilya U. Topper
إيليا توبر Ilya U. Topper نشرت في: 7 أغسطس, 2022