Drone wars have removed our ability to report the horrors of conflict

drones outside
A man walks past graffiti denouncing strikes by US drones in Yemen, painted on a wall in Sanaa, in November 2014. But global audiences are now less likely to see the reality of war for innocent victims [Khaled Abdullah/Reuters]

Drone wars have removed our ability to report the horrors of conflict

What does the future hold for journalism in the ‘third drone age’? A lot of manipulated news, most likely

 

Future wars will be fought by robots, sent to distant lands to hunt and kill. Where there were once boots on the ground, there will be swarms of unmanned drones overhead. But where there were once boots, there were eyes and ears too. The eyes, ears and cameras of the war correspondent will be absent from a computerised conflict, fought from a distant operation centre, thousands of miles away. 

The dawning of the “third drone age” and the prospect of autonomous warfare will have profound implications for civilians living in combat zones, and those innocents killed or injured by military miscalculation. It also has a corrosive effect on transparency and democracy itself, the covert consequences of conflict kept from the enquiring minds of liberal societies left comfortably and cosy in the dark.

When US President Biden withdrew troops from Afghanistan in 2021 and announced his preference for “over-the-horizon” capabilities, he knew it would play well with the American people. No more risk to US military personnel, no more long protracted, expensive ground engagements, no more tearful family farewells, and no more concern for “others” living half a world away. 

The idea of a sky full of killer robots may sound like fantasy science fiction, but we know that Iranian-made so-called kamikaze drones are already being used in the Ukraine conflict. As Russian troops withdrew in numbers from Kherson, reports emerged of multiple drones circling the skies of Ukrainian cities before locking on to their targets and exploding on impact with devastating effect. 

Such weapons are being developed and commissioned by armed forces around the world including the UK. In September 2022, the British Army held a demonstration of “multiple nano-Unmanned Aerial Systems (nUAS)” to test the capability of a swarm to be operated by one individual. Commanding officer Colonel Arthur Dawe said the technology would help by adding “precision strike capability… making us more lethal at range, which will protect our very valuable forces and people”.

The hierarchy of accountability is somewhat fuzzy when there is no hand wielding a weapon, and algorithms are at the controls

 

Advances in technology during the post-9/11 era saw an increased use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, as the “go-to” weapons of choice in the Global War on Terror. There is little doubt that such machines offered the US administration clear advantages in accessing remote areas, surveilling potential targets for lengthy periods, and most importantly not requiring an American pilot in the cockpit. 

Fighting war from a distance has obvious benefits. But it comes at a cost. First, to those innocent civilians living within the arena of robotic warfare. For them, there is no choice, no distance, no technological alternative to the suffering that inevitably comes to the victims of war. But there is another cost, not so immediately clear; a cost to transparency and democracy itself. War correspondents embedded with troops, or working independently, play a critical role in bearing witness to the battle, up close and personal to the bloody realities of combat. But there will no longer be a place for them.

In victory or defeat, the role of the war correspondent stands to support democracy in providing the people back home with accounts of the injuries inflicted in their name. They witness the impact on bombarded communities, document civilian casualties and report violations of international law. They draw the world’s attention to the brutal realities of conflict and have been pivotal in changing the direction of wars of the past. 

The best example is perhaps the Vietnam war, known as the “first televised war” which was broadcast on TV networks across the United States from the mid 1960s. The ability to reach into the homes of the people with images of that war was critical in moving hearts and minds and adding pressure on the US administration to end its involvement. 

Newspaper images of the Mai Lai Massacre, press coverage of the Tet Offensive and news reports of the increasing number of US army body bags returning home added fuel to the protest movement. The media hit the US public full in the face “on colour screens” with the horrific consequences of war, and they were able to do so because they were there. They had access to the battlefield, they saw the devastation with their own eyes and they documented it with their cameras. 

Thirty years later, under George HW Bush, the US entered the first Gulf War. Advances in military technology and political lessons learned from media coverage of Vietnam meant it would be a very different kind of war. The development of “stealth bombers, cruise missiles and laser-guided ‘smart” bombs’” meant that the US and its allies were able to conduct the war against the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, without a significant ground invasion. It also meant that the war was witnessed in a very different way. Instead of graphic pictures of the dead and injured, lying mangled and lifeless in the bloody, dusty aftermath of an attack, the US military released cockpit imagery of laser guided missiles hitting their targets. But these were not images captured by impartial truth-seekers. These were carefully manipulated messages of military precision without the messy ramifications of civilian casualties splashed across newspapers and beamed into living rooms. This was the first war at a comfortable distance. 

The invisibility of the covert drone programme has rendered Western societies deaf, dumb and blind against the tyranny their governments are inflicting on others

 

There were some reporters present on the ground, but they were hamstrung by a new “pool” system controlled by the US military with severely limited access. Stanley Cloud, the Washington Bureau Chief for Time Magazine said: “We’re getting only the information the Pentagon wants us to get. This is an intolerable effort by the government to manage and control the press.” 

The sense of distance from the impact of the coalition’s bombardment of Iraq inspired French philosopher and sociologist, Jean Baudrillard to write his triptych of essays, “The Gulf War Did Not Take Place”. In it he described the unreality and detachment of that war. He referred to the cockpit imagery through which the pilot viewed his targeted victim as “electronic interference that creates a sort of barricade behind which he becomes invisible”. 

Since the first Gulf War, technology has removed the pilot even further. As much as there is a detachment from the killing, there is also now detachment from accountability when the inevitable mistakes are made. We have seen countless US drone attacks gone wrong: “The wedding that became a funeral” in Yemen, the Datta Khel drone attack that killed 40 innocent civilians at a tribal meeting in Pakistan and the strike in Kabul in 2021 that killed 10 members of one family, including seven children, just as the US was withdrawing from Afghanistan. The hierarchy of accountability is somewhat fuzzy when there is no hand wielding a weapon, and algorithms are at the controls.

The many documented incidents of civilian casualties have cast a long shadow over the much-touted precision of drones. Secretary General of Amnesty International, and former UN Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial and Arbitrary Execution, Agnes Callamard has called the “precision” labelling of drones a “myth”, saying they were “ten times more likely to cause civilian casualties than conventional air attacks”.

Documenting civilian casualties in remote areas where there is no military ground presence and no international media has proven less than straightforward. It has required huge determination on the part of organisations like the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, and local NGOs like Mwatana for Human Rights in Yemen. Speaking at a Drone Wars webinar in November 2022, lawyer and accountability specialist Bonyan Gamal expressed the difficulties in seeking accountability for the Yemeni victims of US drone strikes. She said that since 2002, no reparations have been paid and their efforts to obtain redress for the victims has been met by a wall of silence from the US government. 

We must wake up, demand transparency and support a free and independent press to cover each and every conflict, even distant robotic ones

 

The invisibility of the covert drone programme has rendered Western societies deaf, dumb and blind against the tyranny their governments are inflicting on others. Do UK voters know that British-made autonomous Brimstone missiles have been sold to Saudi Arabia and have been used in the war in Yemen? Probably not. No headlines and no colour pictures mean no victims, no outrage, no protests, no pressure to change course. Mobilising western publics around the plight of ‘others’ requires the victims first to be seen and then to be humanised as lives worth grieving and defending.

Both Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch were borne out of the power of the media to expose human rights abuses. Amnesty International originated from a 1961 article in the Observer, written by lawyer Peter Benenson about two Portuguese students jailed for “raising a toast to freedom”. Human Rights Watch, meanwhile, developed out of a campaign to monitor government compliance to the 1975 Helsinki Accords in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. “Helsinki Watch” began in 1978 to expose violations of the agreements through media coverage, and eventually evolved into the global organisation we know today. 

The proliferation of drones and autonomous weapons continues apace while debates about ethics and tighter UN regulation struggle to keep up, and any hope of agreement is trampled under the heavy boots of geopolitics. Western liberal societies are sleep-walking into a dystopian future, in which human rights violations go untold and the civilian victims of war are left unseen and voiceless. They must wake up, invoke the spirit of the Vietnam protest movement, demand transparency and support a free and independent press to cover each and every conflict, even distant robotic ones.

And as governments and militaries around the world forge ahead with remote forms of warfare, sending their killer robots over the horizon, those of us who care to hold them to account must find a way to be there waiting for them.

Pauline Canham is a freelance journalist who volunteers for the justice campaign group, 3DC

 

The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera Journalism Review’s editorial stance

 

 

المزيد من المقالات

حرية الصحافة في الأردن بين رقابة السلطة والرقابة الذاتية

رغم التقدم الحاصل على مؤشر منظمة "مراسلون بلا حدود" لحرية الصحافة، يعيش الصحفيون الأردنيون أياما صعبة بعد حملة تضييقات واعتقالات طالت منتقدين للتطبيع أو بسبب مقالات صحفية. ترصد الزميلة هدى أبو هاشم في هذا المقال واقع حرية التعبير في ظل انتقادات حادة لقانون الجرائم الإلكترونية.

هدى أبو هاشم نشرت في: 12 يونيو, 2024
الاستشراق والإمبريالية وجذور التحيّز في التغطية الغربية لفلسطين

تقترن تحيزات وسائل الإعلام الغربية الكبرى ودفاعها عن السردية الإسرائيلية بالاستشراق والعنصرية والإمبريالية، بما يضمن مصالح النخب السياسية والاقتصادية الحاكمة في الغرب، بيد أنّها تواجه تحديًا من الحركات العالمية الساعية لإبراز حقائق الصراع، والإعراب عن التضامن مع الفلسطينيين.

جوزيف ضاهر نشرت في: 9 يونيو, 2024
"صحافة الهجرة" في فرنسا: المهاجر بوصفه "مُشكِلًا"

كشفت المناقشات بشأن مشروع قانون الهجرة الجديد في فرنسا، عن الاستقطاب القوي حول قضايا الهجرة في البلاد، وهو جدل يمتد إلى بلدان أوروبية أخرى، ولا سيما أن القارة على أبواب الحملة الانتخابية الأوروبية بعد إقرار ميثاق الهجرة. يأتي ذلك في سياق تهيمن عليه الخطابات والمواقف المعادية للهجرة، في ظل صعود سياسي وشعبي أيديولوجي لليمين المتشدد في كل مكان تقريبا.

أحمد نظيف نشرت في: 5 يونيو, 2024
أنس الشريف.. "أنا صاحب قضية قبل أن أكون صحفيا"

من توثيق جرائم الاحتلال على المنصات الاجتماعية إلى تغطية حرب الإبادة الجماعية على قناة الجزيرة، كان الصحفي أنس الشريف، يتحدى الظروف الميدانية الصعبة، وعدسات القناصين. فقد والده وعددا من أحبائه لكنه آثر أن ينقل "رواية الفلسطيني إلى العالم". في هذه المقابلة نتعرف على وجه وملامح صحفي فلسطيني مجرد من الحماية ومؤمن بأنّ "التغطية مستمرة".

أنس الشريف نشرت في: 3 يونيو, 2024
كيف نفهم تصدّر موريتانيا ترتيب حريّات الصحافة عربياً وأفريقياً؟

تأرجحت موريتانيا على هذا المؤشر كثيرا، وخصوصا خلال العقدين الأخيرين، من التقدم للاقتراب من منافسة الدول ذات التصنيف الجيد، إلى ارتكاس إلى درك الدول الأدنى تصنيفاً على مؤشر الحريات، فكيف نفهم هذا الصعود اليوم؟

 أحمد محمد المصطفى ولد الندى
أحمد محمد المصطفى نشرت في: 8 مايو, 2024
تدريس طلبة الصحافة.. الحرية قبل التقنية

ثمة مفهوم يكاد يكون خاطئا حول تحديث مناهج تدريس الصحافة، بحصره في امتلاك المهارات التقنية، بينما يقتضي تخريج طالب صحافة تعليمه حرية الرأي والدفاع عن حق المجتمع في البناء الديمقراطي وممارسة دوره في الرقابة والمساءلة.

أفنان عوينات نشرت في: 29 أبريل, 2024
الصحافة و"بيادق" البروباغندا

في سياق سيادة البروباغندا وحرب السرديات، يصبح موضوع تغطية حرب الإبادة الجماعية في فلسطين صعبا، لكن الصحفي الإسباني إيليا توبر، خاض تجربة زيارة فلسطين أثناء الحرب ليخرج بخلاصته الأساسية: الأكثر من دموية الحرب هو الشعور بالقنوط وانعدام الأمل، قد يصل أحيانًا إلى العبث.

Ilya U. Topper
إيليا توبر Ilya U. Topper نشرت في: 9 أبريل, 2024
الخلفية المعرفية في العلوم الإنسانية والاجتماعية وعلاقتها بزوايا المعالجة الصحفية

في عالم أصبحت فيه القضايا الإنسانية أكثر تعقيدا، كيف يمكن للصحفي أن ينمي قدرته على تحديد زوايا معالجة عميقة بتوظيف خلفيته في العلوم الاجتماعية؟ وماهي أبرز الأدوات التي يمكن أن يقترضها الصحفي من هذا الحقل وما حدود هذا التوظيف؟

سعيد الحاجي نشرت في: 20 مارس, 2024
وائل الدحدوح.. أيوب فلسطين

يمكن لقصة وائل الدحدوح أن تكثف مأساة الإنسان الفلسطيني مع الاحتلال، ويمكن أن تختصر، أيضا، مأساة الصحفي الفلسطيني الباحث عن الحقيقة وسط ركام الأشلاء والضحايا.. قتلت عائلته بـ "التقسيط"، لكنه ظل صامدا راضيا بقدر الله، وبقدر المهنة الذي أعاده إلى الشاشة بعد ساعتين فقط من اغتيال عائلته. وليد العمري يحكي قصة "أيوب فلسطين".

وليد العمري نشرت في: 4 مارس, 2024
الإدانة المستحيلة للاحتلال: في نقد «صحافة لوم الضحايا»

تعرضت القيم الديمقراطية التي انبنى عليها الإعلام الغربي إلى "هزة" كبرى في حرب غزة، لتتحول من أداة توثيق لجرائم الحرب، إلى جهاز دعائي يلقي اللوم على الضحايا لتبرئة إسرائيل. ما هي أسس هذا "التكتيك"؟

أحمد نظيف نشرت في: 15 فبراير, 2024
قرار محكمة العدل الدولية.. فرصة لتعزيز انفتاح الصحافة الغربية على مساءلة إسرائيل؟

هل يمكن أن تعيد قرارات محكمة العدل الدولية الاعتبار لإعادة النظر في المقاربة الصحفية التي تصر عليها وسائل إعلام غربية في تغطيتها للحرب الإسرائيلية على فلسطين؟

Mohammad Zeidan
محمد زيدان نشرت في: 31 يناير, 2024
عن جذور التغطية الصحفية الغربية المنحازة للسردية الإسرائيلية

تقتضي القراءة التحليلية لتغطية الصحافة الغربية لحرب الاحتلال الإسرائيلي على فلسطين، وضعها في سياقها التاريخي، حيث أصبحت الصحافة متماهية مع خطاب النخب الحاكمة المؤيدة للحرب.

أسامة الرشيدي نشرت في: 17 يناير, 2024
أفكار حول المناهج الدراسية لكليات الصحافة في الشرق الأوسط وحول العالم

لا ينبغي لكليات الصحافة أن تبقى معزولة عن محيطها أو تتجرد من قيمها الأساسية. التعليم الأكاديمي يبدو مهما جدا للطلبة، لكن دون فهم روح الصحافة وقدرتها على التغيير والبناء الديمقراطي، ستبقى برامج الجامعات مجرد "تكوين تقني".

كريغ لاماي نشرت في: 31 ديسمبر, 2023
لماذا يقلب "الرأسمال" الحقائق في الإعلام الفرنسي حول حرب غزة؟

التحالف بين الأيديولوجيا والرأسمال، يمكن أن يكون التفسير الأبرز لانحياز جزء كبير من الصحافة الفرنسية إلى الرواية الإسرائيلية. ما أسباب هذا الانحياز؟ وكيف تواجه "ماكنة" منظمة الأصوات المدافعة عن سردية بديلة؟

نزار الفراوي نشرت في: 29 نوفمبر, 2023
السياق الأوسع للغة اللاإنسانية في وسائل إعلام الاحتلال الإسرائيلي في حرب غزة

من قاموس الاستعمار تنهل غالبية وسائل الإعلام الإسرائيلية خطابها الساعي إلى تجريد الفلسطينيين من صفاتهم الإنسانية ليشكل غطاء لجيش الاحتلال لتبرير جرائم الحرب. من هنا تأتي أهمية مساءلة الصحافة لهذا الخطاب ومواجهته.

شيماء العيسائي نشرت في: 26 نوفمبر, 2023
استخدام الأرقام في تغطية الحروب.. الإنسان أولاً

كيف نستعرض أرقام الذين قتلهم الاحتلال الإسرائيلي دون طمس هوياتهم وقصصهم؟ هل إحصاء الضحايا في التغطية الإعلامية يمكن أن يؤدي إلى "السأم من التعاطف"؟ وكيف نستخدم الأرقام والبيانات لإبقاء الجمهور مرتبطا بالتغطية الإعلامية لجرائم الحرب التي ترتكبها إسرائيل في غزة؟

أروى الكعلي نشرت في: 14 نوفمبر, 2023
الصحافة ومعركة القانون الدولي لمواجهة انتهاكات الاحتلال الإسرائيلي

من وظائف الصحافة رصد الانتهاكات أثناء الأزمات والحروب، والمساهمة في فضح المتورطين في جرائم الحرب والإبادات الجماعية، ولأن الجرائم في القانون الدولي لا تتقادم، فإن وسائل الإعلام، وهي تغطي حرب إسرائيل على فلسطين، ينبغي أن توظف أدوات القانون الدولي لتقويض الرواية الإسرائيلية القائمة على "الدفاع عن النفس".

نهلا المومني نشرت في: 8 نوفمبر, 2023
"الضحية" والمظلومية.. عن الجذور التاريخية للرواية الإسرائيلية

تعتمد رواية الاحتلال الموجهة بالأساس إلى الرأي العام الغربي على ركائز تجد تفسيرها في الذاكرة التاريخية، محاولة تصوير الإسرائيليين كضحايا للاضطهاد والظلم مؤتمنين على تحقيق "الوعد الإلهي" في أرض فلسطين. ماهي بنية هذه الرواية؟ وكيف ساهمت وسائل التواصل الاجتماعي في تفتيتها؟

حياة الحريري نشرت في: 5 نوفمبر, 2023
كيف تُعلق حدثاً في الهواء.. في نقد تغطية وسائل الإعلام الفرنسية للحرب في فلسطين

أصبحت وسائل الإعلام الأوروبية، متقدمةً على نظيرتها الأنغلوساكسونية بأشواط في الانحياز للسردية الإسرائيلية خلال تغطيتها للصراع. وهذا الحكم، ليس صادراً عن متعاطف مع القضية الفلسطينية، بل إن جيروم بوردون، مؤرخ الإعلام وأستاذ علم الاجتماع في جامعة تل أبيب، ومؤلف كتاب "القصة المستحيلة: الصراع الإسرائيلي الفلسطيني ووسائل الإعلام"، وصف التغطية الجارية بــ" الشيء الغريب".

أحمد نظيف نشرت في: 2 نوفمبر, 2023
الجانب الإنساني الذي لا يفنى في الصحافة في عصر ثورة الذكاء الاصطناعي

توجد الصحافة، اليوم، في قلب نقاش كبير حول التأثيرات المفترضة للذكاء الاصطناعي على شكلها ودورها. مهما كانت التحولات، فإن الجانب الإنساني لا يمكن تعويضه، لاسيما فهم السياق وإعمال الحس النقدي وقوة التعاطف.

مي شيغينوبو نشرت في: 8 أكتوبر, 2023
هل يستطيع الصحفي التخلي عن التعليم الأكاديمي في العصر الرقمي؟

هل يستطيع التعليم الأكاديمي وحده صناعة صحفي ملم بالتقنيات الجديدة ومستوعب لدوره في البناء الديمقراطي للمجتمعات؟ وهل يمكن أن تكون الدورات والتعلم الذاتي بديلا عن التعليم الأكاديمي؟

إقبال زين نشرت في: 1 أكتوبر, 2023
العمل الحر في الصحافة.. الحرية مقابل التضحية

رغم أن مفهوم "الفريلانسر" في الصحافة يطلق، عادة، على العمل الحر المتحرر من الالتزامات المؤسسية، لكن تطور هذه الممارسة أبرز أشكالا جديدة لجأت إليها الكثير من المؤسسات الإعلامية خاصة بعد جائحة كورونا.

لندا شلش نشرت في: 18 سبتمبر, 2023
إعلام المناخ وإعادة التفكير في الممارسات التحريرية

بعد إعصار ليبيا الذي خلف آلاف الضحايا، توجد وسائل الإعلام موضع مساءلة حقيقية بسبب عدم قدرتها على التوعية بالتغيرات المناخية وأثرها على الإنسان والطبيعة. تبرز شادن دياب في هذا المقال أهم الممارسات التحريرية التي يمكن أن تساهم في بناء قصص صحفية موجهة لجمهور منقسم ومتشكك، لحماية أرواح الناس.

شادن دياب نشرت في: 14 سبتمبر, 2023
تلفزيون لبنان.. هي أزمة نظام

عاش تلفزيون لبنان خلال الأيام القليلة الماضية احتجاجات وإضرابات للصحفيين والموظفين بسبب تردي أوضاعهم المادية. ترتبط هذه الأزمة، التي دفعت الحكومة إلى التلويح بإغلاقه، مرتبطة بسياق عام مطبوع بالطائفية السياسية. هل تؤشر هذه الأزمة على تسليم "التلفزيون" للقطاع الخاص بعدما كان مرفقا عاما؟

حياة الحريري نشرت في: 15 أغسطس, 2023